7 Major Assumptions We Never Questions But Should

Srinivas Rao
16 min readOct 24, 2023

Recently, I found myself in a conversation with my dad about the impending end of my car lease. During this discussion, I suggested the idea of not having a car at all. Surprisingly, he thought it was a great idea. This moment made me realize that this was just one of many assumptions we never question in our lives.

In our journey through life, we often operate on autopilot, guided by a set of assumptions we hardly ever challenge. These assumptions, often absorbed from our society, family, and culture, subtly shape our choices, behaviors, and expectations. And sometimes, it takes a simple conversation about a car lease ending to bring these assumptions into sharp focus.

But what if we could challenge these invisible scripts? What if we could redefine our life’s trajectory by questioning these deeply ingrained assumptions? This post will explore seven such major assumptions that, when questioned, can lead to a profound shift in our perspective, opening up a world of possibilities and freedom. So, buckle up and prepare to embark on a journey of self-discovery and liberation.

1. Car Ownership: A Convenience or a Necessity?

Unless you’re nestled in New York or a select few American cities where public transport is up to snuff, you probably take it as a given that you need a car.

But the meteoric rise of Lyft and Uber teaches us a different lesson: we don’t need a car of our own, we just need access to one. Delve into the core principle of these companies, and you’ll find a high demand for an underutilized resource.

The birth of these companies came from challenging the assumption that car ownership was a must.

Instead of simply accepting that you need a car, question what function it serves. Most of the time, your car is simply taking up space in driveways and parking lots.

However, there are certain circumstances where a car might genuinely be a necessity.

  • You live in a location with inadequate or non-existent public transport, necessitating extensive driving.
  • Your job involves a lot of driving, like delivery drivers or field service roles.
  • You’re a sales rep…

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Srinivas Rao

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